RoHS

The RoHS legislation 2002/95/EC and 2011/65/EU (RoHS-2)

 

EU legislation restricting the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS Directive 2002/95/EC) and promoting the collection and recycling of such equipment (WEEE Directive 2002/96/EC) has been in force since February 2003. The objective of these schemes is to increase the recycling and/or re-use of such products. It also requires heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium, and hexavalent chromium and flame retardants such as polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) or polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) to be substituted by safer alternatives.

 

Inadequately treated e-waste poses environmental and health risks. In December 2008, the European Commission therefore proposed to revise the directives on electrical and electronic equipment in order to tackle the fast increasing waste stream of such products. The aim is to increase the amount of e-waste that is appropriately treated and to reduce the volume that goes to disposal. The aim of the RoHS recast was also to reduce administrative burdens and ensure coherency with newer policies and legislation covering, for example, chemicals and the new legislative framework for the marketing of products in the European Union. The RoHS Recast Directive (RoHS 2) was published in the Official Journal on 1 July 2011.

 

DNP Imagingcomm Europe B.V., supplier of Thermal Transfer Ribbons and Dye Sublimation Ribbons, declares that, to its knowledge as to the date of this statement, the products are no subject to the requirements of Directive 2011-65-EU Annex II.

 


This declaration is based on DNP Imagingcomm Europe B.V.’s understanding of the RoHS Directive and by the following statement given by the Dutch government:

 

The moment a ribbon is mounted into a printer it becomes a part of EEE (Electronical and Electric Equipment) and should comply with RoHS-II. However, the moment the ribbon onto a core is delivered seperately, it is actually meant as a part for EEE, but if it misses any electrical connection and it is driven mechanically, it cannot be qualified as being EEE. The ribbon does not need an electrical current to operate. In this case it is the printer that requires electrical current to operate.

The RoHS legislation 2002/95/EC and 2011/65/EU (RoHS-2)

EU legislation restricting the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS Directive 2002/95/EC) and promoting the collection and recycling of such equipment (WEEE Directive 2002/96/EC) has been in force since February 2003. The objective of these schemes is to increase the recycling and/or re-use of...